Artist and designer Katie Johnson has a happening for monsters.

Not the interests of the morbid smorgasbord, but the cutesy, kid-friendly genu.

GIF from “Monsters, Inc.”

She’s always loved the wide-open inventive process of dreaming up a new being and putting it on paper. “It’s a merriment inventive dump, ” she said. “You can make a being out of anything. So when I was younger, that was my go-to when I felt like drawing.”

Katie Johnson( right) mulls her next being. Photo used with permission.

Little did she know, ogres would come to predominate her free time as a young adult, too. After college, Johnson started working as a designer with an advertising conglomerate in Austin, Texas. But as a inventive at heart, she also wanted to pursue her own projects.

An idea came to her after recognizing a photograph serial called “Wonderland” by artist Yeondoo Jung, who re-created children’s portrays as staged, dream-like photo.

Johnson combined her affection of ogres with Jung’s idea of building on children’s ability to launch The Monster Project.

Through The Monster Project, Johnson invites elementary students to depict their own ogres. Then professional artists drawing their ogres to life.

Getting started wasn’t easy because she was the only artist on call. “I did 20 portrays by myself, ” Johnson said. “It was way too much.”

She likewise wasn’t assembling one of her main objective: “It was missing multiple aesthetic attitudes. I craved the kids to see different ways to be creative.”

Here’s a sampling from the project’s more than 100 re-created portrays:

Re-created by Gianluca Maruotti.

Re-created by Marija Tiurina.

Re-created by Muti.

Re-created by Milan Vasek.

Re-created by Marie Bergeron.

Re-created by JeanPierre Le Roux.

Re-created by Jake Armstrong.

Re-created by Charles Santoso.

Re-created by Eric Orange.

Re-created by Aaron Zenz.

The website clarifies: “With a decrease emphasis on artistries in schools, many children dont have the opportunity for inventive journey they deserve. Thats a odious tendency we would like to destroy.”

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